Great feedback at AMCA in Kansas City

There were a few boxes to unpack for the Biogents stand at the AMCA fair.

The 84th AMCA Annual Meeting (February/March 2018) in Kansas City saw no less than six presentations on REMOSIS devices – four on the BG-Counter and two more on the species-ID capabilities. The technology was also showcased on the Biogents stand at the fair that accompanied the conference.

In the scientific program, users from four American mosquito control districts show-cased their experiences with the BG-Counter: Mark Kartzinel presented a talk entiteled “Real-time district-wide mosquito surveillance with the Biogents BG-Counter” (Kartzinel & Cliftin, AMCA 2018: Abstracts, p. 39). The authors work for the Collier County Mosquito  Control District in Florida. Mario Boisvert gave an oral presentation entiteled “BG-Counter: a very efficient multi-task tool” (Boisvert, Hartle, Sorensen & Buettner, AMCA 2018: Abstracts, p. 45). Mario Boisvert and his colleagues work for the Placer County Mosquito & Vector Control District in California. Barbara Bayer shared  the Manatee County Mosquito Control District’s  “Field observations from a BG-Counter used with a CDC light trap in Manatee County” (Bayer & Latham, AMCA 2018: Abstracts, p.45). Ary Faraji presented “New Technologies and Operational Research at the Salt Lake City Mosquito Abatement District”, including the BG-Counter (Faraji, White, Dewsnup & Sorensen, AMCA 2018 2018: Abstracts, p.40).

Confusion matrix showing the highly accurate distinction between six mosquito species the REMOSIS device is capable of.

Biogents presented findings that the REMOSIS technology is able to distinguish between malaria mosquitoes that had could so far only be distinguished using genetic test (Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles arabiensis). Both species are important malaria vectors, but with marked differences in ecology and behaviour. To be able to distinguish them quickly and in the field was considered an important tool for research and control. (Rose et al.: Distinguishing populations of living Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles arabiensis using a non-invasive opto-acoustic analysis of wing beat patterns. AMCA 2018: Abstracts, p.61-62).

We also showed results from investigations that were performed together with research partners from two mosquito control districts. These studies included the automatic distinction between species that were simultaneously present (Culex tarsalis, Culex pipiens and Anopheles freeborni). Due to their different biology and vector potentials, it is important to identify these species to be able to control them most effectively. We also demonstrated the automatic identification of the sexes of both the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, and the yellow fever or dengue mosquito, Aedes aegypti. This can be especially helpful in research and control programs that are using the release of sterile male mosquitoes (Sterile Insect Technique, SIT) and sililar approaches. (Weber et al.: Laboratory and field results from an enhanced BG-Sentinel with a mosquito wingbeat analyser. AMCA 2018: Abstracts, p.44)

To download the conference abstract book, please click here.